Weekly Assignment #8

By midnight of the day before the next class, please submit a chronological list of journal articles and books related to your topic that form what we might call a “citation chain” or simply a “scholarly conversation” — you’re looking for works that cite each other, in short. To generate this list, please find the oldest relevant journal article that you can and follow it forward as far as you can by using the “cited by” link in Google Scholar and the “Cited Reference Search” in Web of Science. List as many articles as you like that are both useful to you and within six degrees of separation of that original article. (Not all articles on the list must cite that original article; some can cite articles that cite that original article.)

Annotations are not required this week, but if you like, you can write a paragraph describing your search experience — I always enjoy reading those — and/or discussing any interesting information you got by, for instance, pressing the “analyze” button in Web of Science. Any surprises as to how many times an article is or is not cited?

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21 Comments

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21 responses to “Weekly Assignment #8

  1. lst source:
    Post-Alienation: Recent Directions in Jewish-American Literature – SL Kremer
    Cited by:
    – “Do We Not Know the Meaning of Aesthetic Gratification?”: Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl, the Akedah, and the Ethics of Holocaust Literary Aesthetics – Joseph Alkana
    2nd Source:
    Cynthia Ozick – J Lowin
    Cited by:
    – Creation?s Covenant: The Art of Cynthia Ozick – TL Parrish
    Which is cited by:
    The Golem Speaks: A Study of Four Modern Jewish American Novels – FW Tytell
    – Disruptive Memories: Cynthia Ozick, Assimilation, and the Invented Past. – PK Powers
    Which is cited by:
    The Golem Speaks: A Study of Four Modern Jewish American Novels
    FW Tytell
    And finally, J. Lowin is cited by the original citation from the first source:
    – “Do We Not Know the Meaning of Aesthetic Gratification?”: Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl, the Akedah, and the Ethics of Holocaust Literary Aesthetics – Joseph Alkana
    3rd source:
    Cynthia Ozick’s Comic Art: From Levity to Liturgy – SB Cohen
    Cited by:
    – Disruptive Memories: Cynthia Ozick, Assimilation, and the Invented Past. – PK Powers
    Who is cited by:
    The Golem Speaks: A Study of Four Modern Jewish American Novels
    FW Tytell
    – ” Envy”: Cynthiz Ozick Meets Melanie Klein – A Gordon
    – A Bibliography of Works on Judaism
    And once again, cited by the original source:
    – “Do We Not Know the Meaning of Aesthetic Gratification?”: Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl, the Akedah, and the Ethics of Holocaust Literary Aesthetics – Joseph Alkana
    4th source:
    The Religious Art of Cynthia Ozick – L Harap
    Cited by:
    Creation?s Covenant: The Art of Cynthia Ozick – TL Parrish
    Which also used J. Lowin’s “Cynthia Ozick” as a citation.
    5th Source:
    Cynthia Ozick and the Transgressions of Art – JH Burstein
    Cited by:
    – Creation?s Covenant: The Art of Cynthia Ozick – TL Parrish
    – ” Do We Not Know the Meaning of Aesthetic Gratification?”: Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl, the Akedah, ? J Alkana
    Both of which are previously metioned, and Alkana’s work is mentioned 3 times thus far, with Parrish mentioned twice.
    6th source:
    Post-Alienation: Recent Directions in Jewish-American Literature – SL Kremer (Author of the first source)
    Cited by:
    – The Golem Speaks: A Study of Four Modern Jewish American Novels – FW Tytell
    – Contemporary Jewish American Writers and the Multicultural Dilemma: Return of the Exiled. – SL Kremer
    – ” Do We Not Know the Meaning of Aesthetic Gratification?”: Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl, the Akedah” – J Alkana
    All of which are previously mentioned, and Alkana, being the citer for the first source, is thus six degrees from Kremer. Additionally, “The Golem Speaks: A Study of Four Modern Jewish American Novels” by FW Tytell uses each source as a reference for their work.

  2. Eric Gerson

    Sorry, the citations are courtesy of Google Scolar, found by using the keywords: “Jewish American Literature” and then moving rhrough citations.

  3. Sophie Honeycutt

    Stephen North?s article, ?The Idea of a Writing Center,? published in 1984, has been cited by 30 authors according to Google Scholar. On the list of authors who cited North, I found numerous familiar names including Muriel Harris and D. Healy. Harris? article is titled ?Tutoring ESL Students? and appears first on Google Scholar?s cited by list. Her article is cited by 15 authors, but none of their names caught my eye. Nearly everything I?ve read since starting this literature review has cited Stephen North?s popular article, but GoogleScholar didn?t list any of the 30-40 I?ve read. Much of what Google gave me was around 2004 and not exactly pertinent. They may have cited North?s article, but it wasn?t for their own writing center topical purposes. They mostly mentioned it in passing but did not expand on it.
    In Web of Science, I was again surprised to be shown only 10 authors had cited North. These 10, however, were very familiar to me; I had read a majority of them. I liked the Analyze feature on Web of science most. It gives interesting information. The list those who cited North’s article was as follows:
    1. Mackiewicz JThe functions of formulaic and nonformulaic compliments in interactions about technical writing IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION 49 (1): 12-27 MAR 2006 Times Cited: 0
    2. Mackiewicz JHinting at what they mean: Indirect suggestions in writing tutors’ interactions with engineering students IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION 48 (4): 365-376 DEC 2005 Times Cited: 0
    3. Lerner NThe teacher-student writing conference and the desire for intimacy COLLEGE ENGLISH 68 (2): 186-208 NOV 2005 Times Cited: 0
    4. Williams J, Severino CThe writing center and second language writers JOURNAL OF SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING 13 (3): 165-172 SEP 2004 Times Cited: 0
    5. Williams JTutoring and revision: Second language writers in the writing center JOURNAL OF SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING 13 (3): 173-201 SEP 2004 Times Cited: 0
    6. Thonus TWhat are the differences? Tutor interactions with first- and second-language writers JOURNAL OF SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING 13 (3): 227-242 SEP 2004 Times Cited: 1
    7. Welch NPlaying with reality: Writing centers after the mirror stage COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION 51 (1): 51+ SEP 1999 Times Cited: 1
    8. Boquet EH’Our little secret’: A history of writing centers, pre- to post-open admissions (English instruction, US universities) COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION 50 (3): 463-482 FEB 1999 Times Cited: 2
    9. HARRIS M, SILVA TTUTORING ESL STUDENTS – ISSUES AND OPTIONS COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION 44 (4): 525-537 DEC 1993 Times Cited: 5
    10. MERRILL R, FARRELL TJ, SCHELL EE, et al.SYMPOSIUM ON THE 1991 PROGRESS REPORT FROM THE CCCC COMMITTEE-ON-PROFESSIONAL-STANDARDS COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION 43 (2): 154-175 MAY 1992 Times Cited: 2
    Because Muriel Harris? ?Tutoring? was cited by 5, the most on the list, I checked on those citations, which gave me nearly the same results. Turns out, 4-8 on the North list were also on Harris?. This repetition shows intertextuality. I think I received short lists due to a publication date issue, although I asked for any articles of any time frame. Most of the results are fairly current, most from the last five years, and most of the stuff I?ve been reading has been from the last 25. Somehow I think I made an input mistake, but though I went back and made sure to get my search options filled in correctly, my results came up the same.

  4. Mary Kohn

    1. Wolfram, Walt; Cater, Phillip, Moriello, Becky. (2004) Emerging Hispanic English: New Dialect Formation in the American South. Journal of Sociolinguistics. Vol. 8, Issue 3. 339-358.
    2. Mallison, c. (2006)Chicano English in Context. American Speech. 81 (2) 213-217.
    This article cited the former
    3. Poplack, S. (1978) Dialect Acquusition among Puerto Rican Bilinguals. Languge in Society 7 (1) 89-103.
    This article was cited by the former
    4.Hazen, K. (2002) Identity and Language Variation in a Rural Community. Language 78 (2)240-257.
    This article cited the former
    5. Eckert, P. (1988) Adolescent Social Structure and the Spread of Linguistic Change. Language in Society 17 (2)183-207
    This article was cited by the former
    6. Bayley, R. (1999) Relativisation Strategies in Mexican American English. American Speech 74 (2) 115-139.
    This article cited the former and was cited by no-one.
    7. Ana, Os. (1993) Chicano English and the Nature of the Chicano Language Setting. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences. 15 (1) 3-35.
    This article cited Poplack
    8. Thomas, E.R.(2000) Spectral Difference in Verticle Bar ai Verticle Bar Offsets Conditioned by Voicing of the Following Consonant. Journal of Phonetics 28(1)
    This article cited the former.
    Overall, I felt like I found some very relavent sources this way. Although there are few journals that publish sociolinguistic articles (most are represented in this list) I could watch a trend develop within the discipline for my topic.

  5. Jason Jefferies

    I searched the article “Bad Girls and Sick Boys: Fantasies in Contemporary Art and Culture” (for my research on Vollmann) in Google Scholar and came up with these citations:
    1) The Rumpled Bed of Autobioghraphy:Extravagant Lies, Extravagant Questions by S. Smith and J. Watson
    2)Thresholds of the Flesh: Disability and Dis-ease and Producing Ability Trouble by J Hladki
    3) Medicine Through the Artist’s Eye by YM Barilan
    4) The Informe Body by T Warr
    5) Women as Ruin by TA Rosolowski
    6)Spectacular Shakespeare: Critical Theory and Popular Cinema by C Lehmann and LS Starks.
    When searching for the actual book I am focusing on, “Europe Central”, the only citations I am finding are in book reviews. The book is relatively new (2005), so this is to be expecte4d I guess. It is helpful to know how to do the searches, as I am sure I will use them when dealing with the actual historical figures in “Europe Central”, such as Dmitri Shostakovich or Anna Akhmatova, but for Vollmann and “Europe Central” itself, the searches are of little or no help unless I am looking for works or articles written by Vollmann himself, or about his works related to drugs and prostitution (as opposed to his more historical ones).

  6. April Swarey

    There has been so little written about Anti-Pamela by Eliza Haywood, that I was afraid I would find nothing, but I was pleasantly surprised to find 3 articles in a chain.
    1. The oldest article was “Ev’ry Woman is at Heart a Rake” by PM Spacks, 1974.
    It has been cited three times, once in:
    2. “Chastity and Transgressin in Women’s Writing, 1792-1897: Interrupting the Harlot’s Progress” by R. Eberle, 2002.
    Eberle’s article was then cited by:
    3. “Boudoir Stories: A Novel History of a Room and its Occupants” by Nicole Reynolds, 2004.
    This chain has only 3 entries I know, but it is the longest chain I could dig up in GoogleScholar or Web of Science.
    I was delighted to use Google Scholar especially, because I had not known about the “cited by” feature until last class and I was unaware any kind of scholarly conversation existed for Anti-Pamela or Eliza Haywood. The conversation is small, but at least it has begun, and with two recent connections. That type of find is exciting for me.

  7. Josh Peery

    I searched ISI using ?documentary AND propaganda. This resulted in the follwoing article which related to a famous documentary film theorist.
    BELL F. The Dominie and the Covenant: The Grierson touch (Using documentary film as a means of educating people through propaganda)
    This article cited several sources / articles that I also found to useful fro my topic:
    EISENSTEIN SM
    TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK
    FLAHERTY R
    NANOOK OF NORTH
    GRIERSON J
    DRIFTERS
    WATT H
    NIGHT MAIL
    WATT H
    NORTH SEA
    Further searching also returned several related/cited articles:
    BARSAM R
    GUEST EDITORS FOREWORD + NONFICTION FILM
    QUARTERLY REVIEW OF FILM AND VIDEO 7 (1): 1-6 1982
    Cavalcanti A
    John Grierson and the neorealism movement in British cinema
    POSITIF (502): 57-59 DEC 2002
    BRODE D
    VIDEO-VERITE, DEFINING THE DOCUDRAMA
    TELEVISION QUARTERLY 20 (4): 7-21 1984
    WINSTON B
    THE WHITE MANS BURDEN THE EXAMPLE OF FLAHERTY,ROBERT
    CEPLAIR L, ENGLUND S
    COMMUNIST-PARTY IN HOLLYWOOD
    CINEASTE 10 (1): 3-13 1980
    This method for citation searching resulted in bringing some articles which I found very interesting to my topic to my attention. I think this is a good way to see the ?network? of articles about a topic in a fast and easy way.

  8. Anonymous

    ?The Masculine Queen of’Beowulf.’.?
    M Dockray-Miller – Women and Language, 1998 – questia.com
    Cited by:
    THE ANGLO-SAXON PEACE WEAVING WARRIOR
    AR Andrade – 2006 – etd.gsu.edu
    [BOOK] The Discourse of Enclosure: Representing Women in Old English Literature
    S Horner – 2001 – books.google.com
    This book was in turn cited by:
    ” Nima eow bysne be yssere Iudith”: Deictic Shifting and Didactic Christian Discourse in ? – FullText@NCSU – group of 2
    M Hostetler – Studia Neophilologica, 2004 – Taylor & Francis
    THE ANGLO-SAXON PEACE WEAVING WARRIOR
    AR Andrade – 2006 – etd.gsu.edu
    (interesting little loop there)
    Overall Google had surprisingly few entries in this topic. Most articles had been cited by 2 or fewer other articles. I imagine there as been a good amount of research in this field, so perhaps the database is lacking, or perhaps there isn?t much of a ?conversation? in this field (or it?s simply a fledgling conversation).
    Searching Beowulf and Gender in Web of Science brought up just three articles, none of which had been cited. Here is one ?
    BROGAN JV
    LANGUAGE, SIGN, AND GENDER IN ‘BEOWULF’ – OVERING,GR
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE NOTES 30 (3): 75-78 MAR 1993
    ?Beowulf and women? brought up a few other articles, one of which had been cited 3 times.
    Fee C
    Beag & Beaghroden: Women, treasure and the language of social structure in ‘Beowulf’
    NEUPHILOLOGISCHE MITTEILUNGEN 97 (3): 285-294 1996
    Cited by:
    McFadden B
    Sleeping after the feast: Deathbeds, marriage beds, and the power structure of Heorot (‘Beowulf’) NEOPHILOLOGUS 84 (4): 629-646 OCT 2000
    Mizuno T
    The magical necklace and the fatal corslet in ‘Beowulf’
    ENGLISH STUDIES 80 (5): 377-397 OCT 1999
    Enright MJ
    The warband context of the Unferth episode (A cross-cultural comparison and exploration of the Celtic and Old-Irish influence on ‘Beowulf’)
    SPECULUM-A JOURNAL OF MEDIEVAL STUDIES 73 (2): 297-337 APR 1998
    This last article had been cited a few times, but it seemed to be getting away from the topic at hand.
    Similar to Google, there seem to be a fair number of articles, but there don?t seem to be long-chains of scholarly conversation.

  9. Leigh Youngs

    Buxton,John. Sir Philip Sidney and the English
    Renaissance. St. Martin’s Press. New York:
    1954.
    Sinfield, A. “Astrophil’s Self-Deception.” Essays
    in Criicism 28 (1): 1-18, 1978.
    Jones, A.R. “The Politics of Astrophil and
    Stella.” Studies in English Literature 1500-
    1900. 1984.
    Duncan-Jones, Katherine. Sir Philip Sidney,
    Courtier Poet. Yale University Press.
    London: 1991.
    I had terrible luck with this assignment; I don’t know if I was doing something wrong, or if this just was not a good topic for these databases. I first tried Web of Science, and there were very few articles that were cited. The article cited the most was 15 times, and then the others were cited only once, or not at all, so my chain ended quite quickly. I tried three searches: “Astrophil and Stella;” “Sir Philip Sidney;” and “Astrophel and Stella.” Nothing worked better than the other.
    I then tried Google Scholar, and had even worse luck. Neither one of these databases sorts articles from oldest to newest (unless I was just unable to make it work). Google Scholar lets you know how many times your original search articles were cited, but when you click on “cited 7 times,” the new list does not include their citations. Web of Science was much better in this respect.
    So, what I ended up doing was finding some articles by publication year from both databases, and comparing them to the bibliographies in two books that I have on Sidney. That is how I got my list. I can’t belive the number of articles written on Astrophil and Stella that have never been cited–this lets me know that I have to be very careful in my source selection, as there were only four or so names that were cited relatively often.

  10. Daniela Newland

    I began my search by typing the title of the journal article into _Web of Science_ but got zero results. I then entered the search term “Poisonville,” and again got zero results. When I entered “Poisonville” into _Google Scholar_, I received 35 results, among them my “back-up” article “Going Blood-Simple in Poisonville” which is unfortunately relatively recent, but none of them had the “cited by” link that I needed for this assignment. As a next step, I resorted to the very basics and used Dashiell Hammett as a search term. _Google Scholar_ came back with 1150 results and among them were two that I am actually using for my paper. One, _Dashiell Hammett_ by William Marling, was published in 1983 and cited once by PP Abrahams in 1995 in “On Re-Reading _The Maltese Falcon_” which was not cited by anyone else. Another one, _The American Roman Noir_ by the same author, published in 1995, was cited by ten.
    _The American Roman Noir_ is cited in “Private Investigators in Britain and America.” At this point, I quit following the chain because it turned into private security companies and the Dashiell Hammett bit was lost.
    I began another search in _Google Scholar_ and used Dashiell Hammett Red Harvest as search terms. I received 160 results, but interestingly (and frustratingly, in case that is an adverb), after the first page of results there were almost no “cited by” links. I did, however, find one article that looked promising: “Men Alone: Masculinity, Individualism, and Hard-boiled Fiction” by J Nyman, published in 1997, which is in turn cited in “‘Governing the Soul’ through Remolding the Self: The American Approach” by G. Zhao in 2005. Zhao then cites himself in “Playing as Adaptation? Layered Selfhood and Self-regard in Cultural Contexts” which he also published in 2005. This article is then cited in “Masking as Ludic Practice of Selfhood in Japan” by KP Koepping in 2005. The chain ends here.
    Just to try _Web of Science_ again, I typed in Dashiell Hammett Red Harvest and only got 4 results, two of which are cited by others. “Forms of Labor in Dashiell Hammett?s _Red Harvest_” by Kendrick C Freedman is cited twice and “Dashiell Hammett and the New Individualism” is cited once. I followed the latter since my own research does not focus on the labor element in the novel and found “The Crime of the Sign: Dashiell Hammett’s Detective Fiction” by CD Malmgren. This work is not cited by anybody else here.

  11. Rob Phillips

    1st Article
    Shelton, Frank W. ?Suttree and Suicide.? Southern Quarterly 29 (Fall 1990): 71-83.
    This is the earliest article I found, and neither Google Scholar nor ISI Web of Science/Knowledge recognized the author or title as a cited scholar. Given the nature of the assignment, I wasn?t sure where to go next, so I selected a work often referenced by McCarthy Scholars that was published a few years after this one.
    2nd Article
    Butterworth, D. S. “Pearls as Swine: Recentering the Marginal in Cormac McCarthy?s Suttree.? Hall and Wallach 95-101; rev. ed. 1:131-37.
    Though part of an edited book and not a journal article, I tried Butterworth?s name with Google Scholar with no luck, so I tried ?Pearls as Swine,? which connected me to a 2004 article from Christianity and Literature by a fellow named John Rothfork. With ISI I had no luck at all.
    Next, I selected a 1997 article from a comprehensive McCarthy bibliography.
    Spencer, William C. ?Altered States of Consciousness in Suttree.” Southern Quarterly 35.2 (Winter 1997): 87-92.
    There was a Google Scholar citation for this article but no ?cited by? link; however, I did make one rather interesting discovery. A person I knew from classes at ASU completed a thesis on Suttree in 2001. It was strange to see the name of someone I once took classes with on a Google Scholar search screen. Incidentally, I had no luck duplicating this search with ISI WOS.
    3rd Article
    Traber, Daniel S. ??Ruder Forms Survive,? or Slumming for Subjectivity: Self-Marginalization in Suttree.? Southern Quarterly 37.2 (Winter 1999): 33-46
    Despite my struggles, I tried another journal article. This one is more current than the first few. This article provided a citation with no ?cited by? link, but there was another article on the page, which I chose to explore, though it had no ?cited by? link.
    4th Article
    Canfield, J.D. ?The Dawning of the Age of Aquarius: Abjection, Identity, and the Carnivalesque in Cormac McCarthy?s Suttree.? Contemporary Literature 44.4 (Wtr. 2003): 664-96.
    This article also provided a dead end for the purposes of this assignment. Unless I?m doing something terribly wrong, I did not discover a single journal article with a ?cited by? link. This activity proved to be fruitless and frustrating for me. My struggles might be due to the fact that most of the scholarly writing about Suttree can be found in edited collections of articles and in conference proceedings, though I?m not sure of the extent to which this is relevant.

  12. Lorian Long

    I began the assignment by searching “Mary Gaitskill” with Google Scholar. I came up with a few(!) articles, but they were either too recent (2005) or they did not have any citations listed. My next search was “female sexuality in postmodern literature.” I found the article, “Gender and Sexual Orientation in the Age of Postmodernism,” to be the best result (published in 1996, and had 19 citations).
    Here are some key citations:
    –“Passions in Girls and Women,” by L Hoffman.
    –“Postmodern Solutions and the Limit,” by A Celenza.
    –“Ironic Gender/Authentic Sex,” by M Sex. (how appropriate)
    Next, I decided to try the Web of Science search engine. I entered “female sexuality in postmodern literature” into the search box, and found a very useful article: “Postmodern Concepts of the Body in Jeanette Winterson’s Written on the Body.” Jeanette Winterson is another author I plan on researching, so it was exciting to have her name appear. However, there were no citations for this article. I then tried to search my original article I found through Google Scholar, but I didn’t have any luck with Web of Science. I plan on using Google Scholar in the future.

  13. Lisa Morgan

    I typed ?death penalty? in World of Science and found this article to start with:
    ?Belief Systems and Attitudes Toward the Death-Penalty and Other Punishments?
    By OJ Harvey
    Journal of Personality 54 (4): 659-675 Dec. 1986
    This article was cited 12 times. I have listed 6 of these articles below.
    Messner SF, Baumer EP, Rosenfeld R
    Distrust of government, the vigilante tradition, and support for capital punishment
    LAW & SOCIETY REVIEW 40 (3): 559-590 SEP 2006
    Times Cited: 0
    O’Neil KM, Patry MW, Penrod SD
    Exploring the effects of attitudes toward the death penalty on capital sentencing verdicts
    PSYCHOLOGY PUBLIC POLICY AND LAW 10 (4): 443-470 DEC 2004
    Times Cited: 3
    Sargent MJ
    Less thought, more punishment: Need for cognition predicts support for punitive responses to crime
    PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN 30 (11): 1485-1493 NOV 2004
    Times Cited: 0
    Watson PJ, Ross DF, Morris RJ
    Borderline personality traits correlate with death penalty decisions
    PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 35 (2): 421-429 JUL 2003
    Times Cited: 1
    Baumer EP, Messner SF, Rosenfeld R
    Explaining spatial variation in support for capital punishment: A multilevel analysis
    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY 108 (4): 844-875 JAN 2003
    Times Cited: 7
    Kahan DM
    The secret ambition of deterrence
    HARVARD LAW REVIEW 113 (2): 413-500 DEC 1999
    Times Cited: 64
    I think it?s interesting to note how the sixth article ?The Secret Ambition of Deterrence? by D.M. Kahan which cited the original article by OJ Harvey, was cited 64 times. I wonder if it has to do with the fact that the article ?The Secret Ambition of Deterrence? was published by Harvard Law Review. Maybe the Harvard ?prestige? attracted writers to cite this article as a resource. Maybe the Harvard name added more legitimacy and respect to the article as a resource. I know this would make me want to use this article as a resource for my own research.

  14. I searched on google scholar for the book HEMINGWAY AND THE DEAD GODS by John Killinger (1960). This has been my best sources find so far and it was cited by 6 sources—- one listed twice, and one listed in a foreign language.
    1. HEMINGWAY’S IN OUR TIME: LYRICAL DIMENSIONS
    By Wendolyn E. Tetlow 1992
    This was cited by one article titled:
    ?Dangerous Families? and ?Intimate Harm? in Hemingway?s ?Indian Camp? byL Tyler – TEXAS STUDIES IN LITERATUREAND LANGUAGE 2006
    (neither of these are particluarly helpful)
    2. “Sartre, Nada, and Hemingway’s African Stories”
    bY B Stolzfus – COMPARITIVE LITERATURE STUDIES 2005
    (this could be useful but it is not cited anywhere)
    3. “Dialogical Play in Hemingway’s A FAREWELL TO ARMS” by David Crowe (Not cited anywhere)
    (this article does not seem particularly helpful)
    4. “Hemingway’s Puzzling Pursuit Race” by Charles J. Jr. Nolan; STUDIES IN SHORT FICTION, Vol. 34, 1997 (not cited anywhere)
    I really found a great source listed on the same page as the search for HEMINGWAY AND THE DEAD GODS. It must have been listed as a related article.
    “French and American Philosophical and Literary Existentialism: A Selected Check List” By R Lehan – WISCONSIN STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE, 1960
    This source listed many sources I could use
    1. “Existentialism and the American Novel” YALE FRENCH STUDIES by Jean Bruneau 1948 (putting this in the google scholar search pulled up the information that it was cited by one French work)
    2. “Hemingway’s Ambiguity: Symbolism and Irony” AMERICAN LITERATURE XXVIII 1956 By E.M. Haliday
    (putting this article in the google scholar search led to the HEMINGWAY’S IN OUR TIME: LYRICAL DIMENSIONS By Wendolyn E. Tetlow 1992 book already found—this book cited the above article)
    3. “Existentialism and the Novel: Notes and Questions” CHICAGO REVIEW XIII No. 2 by John C. Holmes 1959
    I was not so lucky on Web of Science. I found the search functions cumbersome. I tried to find John Holmes from one of my journals above and could not find him. I also searched for the Haliday article and found nothing. I did a general search under the category “existentialism in literature” and I found “Existentialism and Alienation in American Literature” SCIENCE AND SOCIETY 1966 by Burgum
    This led to no other cited sources

  15. Leah White

    Google Scholar search: gender language linguistics
    “Think Practically and Look Locally: Language and Gender as Community-Based Practice”
    P Eckert, S McConnell-Ginet – Annual Review of Anthropology, 1992 – JSTOR
    While not the very oldest article I could find, this was one of the oldest with some of the best connections to what I’m looking at. It was cited 126 times. Some random interesting and interesting-looking articles that could be used in research of gender and language follow.
    2nd generation:
    LANGUAGE AND AGENCY
    LM Ahearn – Annual Review of Anthropology, 2001 – phyto.annualreviews.org (cited by 42)
    Men’s Identities and Sociolinguistic Variation: The Case of Fraternity Men
    SF Kiesling – Journal of Sociolinguistics, 1998 – Blackwell Synergy (cited by 21)
    Sex and gender in variationist research
    J Cheshire – The handbook of language variation and change. Oxford: ?, 2002 – www-users.york.ac.uk (cited by 13)
    You Can Be the Baby Brother, But You Aren’t Born Yet: Preschool Girls’ Negotiation for Power and Access in Pretend Play
    A Sheldon – Research on Language and Social Interaction, 1996 – Lawrence Earlbaum (cited by 14)
    3rd generation (cited Scott Kiesling’s article on fraternity men):
    Sex and gender in variationist research
    J Cheshire – The handbook of language variation and change. Oxford: ?, 2002 – www-users.york.ac.uk (cited by 13)
    Again…
    Dude
    SF Kiesling – American Speech, 2004 – muse.jhu.edu (cited by 2)
    Just found this one interesting considering it’s an entire article on the titular term of address.
    [BOOK] Everyday Talk: Building and Reflecting Identities
    K Tracy – 2002 – books.google.com (cited by 14)
    This book also cites the original article.
    Masculinity and Physical Aggression in Canadian Televised Ice-Hockey Commentary
    JA Deby – 2002 – vcn.bc.ca (cited by 2)
    Again, just found this one interesting; it’s a dissertation by a linguistics student at Georgetown.
    4th generation (cited Jenny Cheshire’s article):
    Effects of Talker Gender on Dialect Categorization
    CG Clopper, B Conrey, DB Pisoni – Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 2005 – jls.sagepub.com (cited by 3)
    The social life of phonetics and phonology
    P Foulkes, G Docherty – Journal of Phonetics, 2006 – www-users.york.ac.uk (cited by 2)
    On the non-convergence of phonology, grammar and discourse
    J Cheshire, P Kerswill, A Williams – 2005 – alpha.qmul.ac.uk (cited by 1)
    5th generation (cited Cynthia Clopper’s article on talker gender):
    The Effect of Gender Stereotypes in Language on Attitudes Toward Speakers
    CL Dennison – etd.library.pitt.edu (cited by 0)
    LINGUISTIC EXPERIENCE AND THE PERCEPTUAL CLASSIFICATION OF DIALECT VARIATION
    CG Clopper – 2004 – ling.northwestern.edu (cited by 3)
    6th generation (cited Clopper’s article on perceptual classification of dialect variation):
    The social life of phonetics and phonology
    P Foulkes, G Docherty – Journal of Phonetics, 2006 – www-users.york.ac.uk (cited by 2)
    Again…
    7th generation (cited Foulkes and Docherty’s article):
    two random articles based on speaker identification and syntax in New Zealand English (these really have no bearing on anything I can think of with regard to my topic)
    This was actually pretty interesting for me. Although a lot of the articles that cited the earlier articles tended to become either too generalized or (more often) too specific and at timesobscure, I did find some interesting articles and books that I could use in studying this topic.

  16. Carrie Spruill

    Willis, Deborah. The Gnawing Vulture: Revenge, Trauma Theory, and Titus Andronicus. Shakespeare Quarterly 53.1, 2002: 21-52.
    I used this article because it was the oldest one I could find in my arsenal of materials; all the other older sources were books. I was quite frustrated with the results of my search. Although Google Scholar said the article had been cited once, when I clicked on the link, I got the message that there were no citations. Web of Science did not even give me the false promise of one, as there were no citations. I am attributing this lack of sources to the fact that this article was not very old, and TA is an obscure play not frequently discussed by the critics.

  17. Josh Gane

    I searched for Anti-Oedipus: Capitolism and Schizophrenia by G. Deleuze and F. Guattari, a groundbreaking postmodern/posthumanism book and came up with these books which all referenced it.
    (1) Streetwalking the Metropolis: Women, the City, and Modernity
    DL Parsons – 2000
    (2)Deleuze & Guattari: New Mappings in Politics, Philosophy, and Culture
    E Kaufman, KJ Heller – 1998
    (3)Deleuze and Philosophy: The Difference Engineer
    KEDT Ansell-Pearson – 1997
    (4)Film Production Theory
    JP Geuens – 2000
    (5)Bachelors – group of 2
    RE Krauss – 2000
    (6)The Chains of Eros: The Sexual in Psychoanalysis
    A Green – 2002
    (7)Immaculate defecation: Gilles Deleuze and Flix Guattari in organization theory – group of 2
    BM Srensen – The Sociological Review, 2005

  18. Erika J. Galluppi

    Lieberman, Marcia R. “”Some Day My Prince Will Come”: Female Acculturation through the Fairy Tale.” College English 34.3 (1972): 383-395.
    I conducted my search on Google Scholar, initially looking for fairy tales and gender. I found quite a few books (many of which I had stumbled across before), but few if any scholarly journal articles. Finally, I picked Lieberman’s article as the beginning link in my citation chain. While it isn’t the oldest (1972) or most cited source (cited 25 times), it is the most pertinent.
    > Out of those 25 citations, I found the following sources to be of interest: — 4
    Stone, Kay. “And She Lived Happily Ever After.” Women and Language 19 (1996). (cited by 2)
    Crew, Hilary S. “Spinning New Tales from Traditional Texts: Donna Jo Napoli and the Rewriting of Fairy Tale.” Children’s Literature in Education 33.2 (June 2002): 77-95. (cited by 2 ? both of which were forms of the Parson?s article)
    Trousdale, Ann M. and McMillan, Sally. “”Cinderella Was a Wuss”: A Young Girl’s Responses to Feminist and Patriarchal Folktales.” Children?s Literature in Education 34.1 (March 2003): 1-28. (cited by 2)
    Parson, Linda T. “Ella Evolving: Cinderella Stories and the Construction of Gender-Appropriate Behavior.” Children?s Literature in Education 35.2 (June 2004): 135-154. (no citations)
    From these four sources, I chose to trace forward the Stone and Trousdale/McMillan articles.
    > Sources citing Stone?s article: — 2
    Hanlon, TL. “Strong Women in Appalachian Folktales.” The Lion and the Unicorn 24 (2000): 225-246. (no citations)
    The second article citing Stone proved to be an unpublished student paper, so I disregarded that as a usable source. (However, I would absolutely love to take the Twisted Disney course for which the student wrote the paper.)
    > Sources citing the Trousdale/McMillan article: — 2
    Trousdale, Ann M. “Intersections of spirituality, religion and gender in children?s literature.” International Journal of Children’s Spirituality 10.1 (2005): 61-79. (no citations)
    Wojtalik, Janet Rose. “There’s No Place Like Home? The Effects of Childhood Themes on Women’s Aspirations Toward Leadership Roles.” Diss. Duquesne U, 2006. (no citations)
    Neither of these sources was all that pertinent to my topic, so I felt like my citation chain came to a dead end. I tried backtracking all the way back to Lieberman to find more source material, but only encountered more dead ends.
    What I found most interesting (and let me know that I was on the right track) is that most if not all of the pertinent articles that I did find quoted or otherwise cited Jack Zipes’ “Don?t Bet on the Prince” (1986) book, which is one of my “bibles” for my topic. I’m eager to see what will happen when I plug in Zipes’ book as my initial link in the citation chain and trace this source forward. Google Scholar only lists 26 citations for Zipes, but I?m sure that he?s influenced far more sources than that.

  19. Ashley Merrill

    My search term on Web of Science was “nancy drew” (without quotation marks). Of the 28 results I found, only 6 had been cited by other articles.
    The oldest is “The strange case of Nancy Drew,” by Daigon, which was in the English Journal, vol. 53, no. 9, 1964. This article was cited by “High-School Reading, 1964,” in a 1965 article in Journal of Reading, vol. 9, no. 2.
    The next oldest article is “Negro Stereotypes in Children’s Literature – Case of Nancy Drew,” by Jones, in the Journal of Negro Education, vol. 40, no. 2, 1971. It’s cited in another reading article, “Summary of Investigations Related to Reading,” from a 1973 volume of Reading Research Quarterly.
    The next oldest article was cited 4 times: “Landscape and Social Values in Popular Children’s Literature – Nancy Drew Mysteries,” by Brookergross, in the Journal of Geography, vol. 80, no. 2, 1981. The four articles which cite it: the first references portrayals of Singapore in literature, “Exalting the past: nostalgia and the construction of heritage in children’s literature” by L Kong and L Tay, in Area vol. 30 no. 2, 1998. The next is “The child is father to the manager – Images of organizations in United States Children’s Literature” by VH Ingersoll and GB Adams, in Organizational Studies vol. 13 no. 4, 1992. The third is “Teaching about Race, Gender, Class and Geography through Fiction” by Brookergross, in the Journal of Geography in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 1, 1991. The oldest is “Humanistic Geography of Perception and Behavior – A Course Outline,” by Weightman, in the Journal of Geography vol. 84 no. 1, 1985.
    This was followed by “Tom Swift, Nancy Drew and Pals All Had the Same Dad,” by Watson, in the Smithsonian vol. 22 no. 7, 1991. This article was cited by “Imperialism and manliness in Edwardian boys’ novels” by Hugill, in Ecumene vol. 6 no. 3, 1999.
    The 1993 article “In Search of Nancy Drew, The Snow Queen, and Room 19 – Cruising for Feminine Discourse,” by Brown, in Frontiers – A Journal of Women’s Studies, vol. 13 no. 2, was cited by “Poaching on men’s philosophies of rhetoric: Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century rhetorical theory by women” by Donawerth, in Philosophy and Rhetoric vol. 33 no. 3, 2000.
    By far the most cited (at 8 times) was “If They Read Nancy Drew, So What – Series Books Readers Talk Back,” by Ross, in Library & Information Science Research vol. 17 no. 3, 1995.
    It has been cited by:
    – Singleton E
    The ‘Girls of Central High’: How a Progressive Era book series for girls furthered the cause of female interschool sport
    CHILDRENS LITERATURE IN EDUCATION 37 (3): 211-227 SEP 2006
    – Rothbauer P
    “People aren’t afraid anymore, but it’s hard to find books”: Reading practices that inform the personal and social identities of self-identified lesbian and queer young women
    CANADIAN JOURNAL OF INFORMATION AND LIBRARY SCIENCE-REVUE CANADIENNE DES SCIENCES DE L INFORMATION ET DE BIBLIOTHECONOMIE 28 (3): 53-74 SEP 2004
    – McKechnie LEF
    “I’ll keep them for my children” (Kevin, nine years): Children’s personal collections of books and other media
    CANADIAN JOURNAL OF INFORMATION AND LIBRARY SCIENCE-REVUE CANADIENNE DES SCIENCES DE L INFORMATION ET DE BIBLIOTHECONOMIE 28 (4): 73-88 DEC 2004
    – Singleton E
    Grace and Dorothy: Collisions of femininity and physical activity in two early twentieth-century book series for girls
    CHILDRENS LITERATURE IN EDUCATION 35 (2): 113-134 JUN 2004
    – Agosto DE, Hughes-Hassell S, Gilmore-Clough C
    The all-white world of middle-school genre fiction: Surveying the field for multicultural protagonists
    CHILDRENS LITERATURE IN EDUCATION 34 (4): 257-275 DEC 2003
    – Dilevko J, Dali K
    Electronic databases for readers’ advisory services and intellectual access to translated fiction not originally written in English
    LIBRARY RESOURCES & TECHNICAL SERVICES 47 (3): 80-95 JUL 2003
    – Dilevko J, Hayman A
    Collection development patterns of fiction titles in public libraries: The place of independent and small presses
    LIBRARY & INFORMATION SCIENCE RESEARCH 22 (1): 35-59 2000
    – Wiegand WA
    Out of sight, out of mind: Why don’t we have any schools of library and reading studies?
    JOURNAL OF EDUCATION FOR LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 38 (4): 314-326 FAL 1997
    The last results are most likely to yield useful information; the rest, which cited the original Nancy Drew articles, probably aren’t. However, it is interesting that these articles aren’t all interconnected, and that so few of the specifically Nancy Drew articles are cited by any other articles at all.

  20. Anonymous

    Labov, William. “THE SOCIAL STRATIFICATION OF ENGLISH IN NEW YORK CITY.” 1966
    Wells, JC. “Accents of English.” 1982
    Trudgill, P, E Gordon, G Lewis. “New-dialect formation and Southern Hemisphere English: The New Zealand short front vowels ” Journal of Sociolinguistics, 1998
    Watson, CI, M Maclagan, J Harrington. “Acoustic evidence for vowel change in New Zealand English” Language Variation and Change, 2000
    MA Maclagan, E Gordon, G Lewis. “Women and sound change: Conservative and innovative behavior by the same speakers” Language Variation and Change, 2000.
    E Gordon. “‘Capturing a Sound Change’: A Real Time Study Over 15 Years of the NEAR/SQUARE Diphthong Merger in New Zealand English” Australian Journal of Linguistics. Volume 21, Number 2 / October 1, 2001.
    M Maclagan, J Hay. “The rise and rise of New Zealand English DRESS” Proceedings of the Australian International Conference on ?, 2004
    K Drager “The Influence of Social Characteristics on Speech Perception” Unpublished MA Thesis, University of Canterbury, New Zealand, 2005.
    J Hay, P Warren, K Drager “Factors influencing speech perception in the context of a merger-in-progress” Manuscript under review

  21. Susanna Branyon

    I searched Science Web first to get a feel for which articles are the oldest (because they have an easy feature that allows you to order articles by publication date.) The oldest one is from 1982, which I have a hard time believing. So I switched topics and switched to Google Scholar, searching for “Flannery O’Connor and the Christ-haunted South,” a book written in 2004. There were 3 citations of it:
    [CITATION] HARDSCRABBLE CHRISTIANITY Review of Ralph C. Wood’s Flannery O’Connor and the Christ-Haunted South – FullText@NCSU
    J Perreault – REVIEW OF POLITICS, 2005 – UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME
    Web Search – BL Direct
    [CITATION] Flannery O’Connor and the Christ-Haunted South, by Ralph C. Wood
    C Bruce – THEOLOGY TODAY-PENNSYLVANIA-, 2005 – SCIENCE PRESS
    Web Search – BL Direct
    [CITATION] Review of Flannery O’Connor and the Christ-Haunted South by Ralph C. Wood
    AB Gardiner – NEW OXFORD REVIEW, 2006 – NEW OXFORD REVIEW INC.
    Web Search – BL Direct
    However, several others came up that were people’s theses…does that count? Also, there were several references that came up looking less-than-academic…they were mostly religious works, but not the scholarly kind. What does it take to be posted on Google Scholar?